Sarus Crane

Crane, Sarus

Share:

  • Information
  • Conservation
  • Lifestyle

Description

Reaching nearly 6 feet in height, these are the largest of the crane species. The body is a nearly uniform gray excepting the head, which is bare and a startling red color. As adults, the red skin gives way to a paler “bald spot” at the apex of the skull.

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Gruiformes
Family
Gruidae
Genus
Grus
Species
G. antigone
Conservation Status
Vulnerable

Key Facts

Height
Averages 5.9 ft (~1.8 m)
Weight
11-26 lb (~5-12 kg)

The IUCN Red List describes this species as Vulnerable. Evidence indicates a decline in their overall population primarily due to the habitat loss and the ongoing conversion of wetlands to agricultural uses. Ingestion of pesticides as well as persecution as crop pests are contributing factors as well.

Social Life:
Though considered to be among the least social of the crane species, sarus cranes will occasionally form small flocks outside the breeding season. During the breeding season, mated pairs isolate themselves and will behave aggressively toward any perceived intruder on their nesting territory. While it has been claimed that sarus cranes mate for life, these claims are anecdotal and so far unsupported by research. Sarus cranes perform courtship dances like those of other crane species which incorporate elaborate bobbing and wing displays. Loud, trumpeting calls are often incorporated into these displays.
Habitat and Range:
Saris cranes are found in northern India and Indochina. There are a few isolated populations found in southeast Asia and a north Australian population as well. Sarus cranes are not thought to be migratory which implies that these populations are likely genetically isolated. The species prefers natural wetlands though they have proven adaptable to agricultural wetlands such as rice paddies.
Diet
Fish, frogs, insects and plant matter.
 
Lifespan:
Unknown. Cranes in general are thought to live 30-40 years on average.
Predators:
Wild dogs, jackals, and house crows are counted among the sarus crane’s predators. Humans are also know to prey on the cranes and their eggs.
Reproduction:
Sexual Maturity: Unknown
Mating season: June-September (influenced by the rainy season).
Incubation: 28-31 days
No. of young: 1-3 eggs
Information

Description

Reaching nearly 6 feet in height, these are the largest of the crane species. The body is a nearly uniform gray excepting the head, which is bare and a startling red color. As adults, the red skin gives way to a paler “bald spot” at the apex of the skull.

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Gruiformes
Family
Gruidae
Genus
Grus
Species
G. antigone
Conservation Status
Vulnerable

Key Facts

Height
Averages 5.9 ft (~1.8 m)
Weight
11-26 lb (~5-12 kg)
Conservation

The IUCN Red List describes this species as Vulnerable. Evidence indicates a decline in their overall population primarily due to the habitat loss and the ongoing conversion of wetlands to agricultural uses. Ingestion of pesticides as well as persecution as crop pests are contributing factors as well.

Lifestyle
Social Life:
Though considered to be among the least social of the crane species, sarus cranes will occasionally form small flocks outside the breeding season. During the breeding season, mated pairs isolate themselves and will behave aggressively toward any perceived intruder on their nesting territory. While it has been claimed that sarus cranes mate for life, these claims are anecdotal and so far unsupported by research. Sarus cranes perform courtship dances like those of other crane species which incorporate elaborate bobbing and wing displays. Loud, trumpeting calls are often incorporated into these displays.
Habitat and Range:
Saris cranes are found in northern India and Indochina. There are a few isolated populations found in southeast Asia and a north Australian population as well. Sarus cranes are not thought to be migratory which implies that these populations are likely genetically isolated. The species prefers natural wetlands though they have proven adaptable to agricultural wetlands such as rice paddies.
Diet
Fish, frogs, insects and plant matter.
 
Lifespan:
Unknown. Cranes in general are thought to live 30-40 years on average.
Predators:
Wild dogs, jackals, and house crows are counted among the sarus crane’s predators. Humans are also know to prey on the cranes and their eggs.
Reproduction:
Sexual Maturity: Unknown
Mating season: June-September (influenced by the rainy season).
Incubation: 28-31 days
No. of young: 1-3 eggs

Share:

Crane, Sarus