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Stanley Crane Steve Murdock

Crane, Stanley

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Description

Both male and female Stanley cranes are a uniform bluish grey on the head, neck and body and have a wingspan of 180-200 cm (78 inches). Loose feathers on the cheeks and upper nape of the neck give the head the distinctive “cobra” shape. Dark grey elongated secondary feathers with black tips on the wings almost reach the ground are often mistaken for tail feathers. Iris is dark brown. Males are typically larger than females.  Juveniles are pale grey, and do not have the long secondaries.

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Gruiformes
Family
Gruidae
Genus
Anthropoides
Species
A. paradiseus
Conservation Status
Vulnerable

Key Facts

Height
110-120 cm (47 inches)
Weight
4900-5300 g (1.1 pound)

The IUCN Red List describes Anthropoides paradiseus as Vulnerable, with 17,000 mature individuals mostly in South Africa and Namibia. While they face numerous threats, the current population appears largely stable.

Social Life
Stanley cranes tend to be highly communal, occurring in flocks of up to 1,000. When breeding, bonded pairs become more solitary and territorial, avoiding other cranes while they nest.

Habitat and Range
Eastern and Southern South Africa, primarily in dry upland grasslands. Roosts and nests in wetlands. There are a few isolated populations in Namibia. Stanley (Blue) cranes are non-migratory. They are more terrestrial than most other crane species.

Diet
Stanley cranes are omnivores eating plant material, primarily grass seeds, insects (especially grasshoppers), fish, small reptiles, and small mammals. Usually forages on the ground.

Lifespan
About 30 years

Reproduction
Stanley cranes are monogamous,  have a strong pair bond, and both parents care for the chicks.
Sexual Maturity: 3-5 years
Mating Season: Usually October through December. Nests are in grasslands near water. Nests are very minimal, and eggs are often laid on the ground.
Incubation: About 30-33 days.
No. of Young: Female lays 2 eggs. Chicks fledge at about 85 days.

Information

Description

Both male and female Stanley cranes are a uniform bluish grey on the head, neck and body and have a wingspan of 180-200 cm (78 inches). Loose feathers on the cheeks and upper nape of the neck give the head the distinctive “cobra” shape. Dark grey elongated secondary feathers with black tips on the wings almost reach the ground are often mistaken for tail feathers. Iris is dark brown. Males are typically larger than females.  Juveniles are pale grey, and do not have the long secondaries.

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Gruiformes
Family
Gruidae
Genus
Anthropoides
Species
A. paradiseus
Conservation Status
Vulnerable

Key Facts

Height
110-120 cm (47 inches)
Weight
4900-5300 g (1.1 pound)

The IUCN Red List describes Anthropoides paradiseus as Vulnerable, with 17,000 mature individuals mostly in South Africa and Namibia. While they face numerous threats, the current population appears largely stable.

Social Life
Stanley cranes tend to be highly communal, occurring in flocks of up to 1,000. When breeding, bonded pairs become more solitary and territorial, avoiding other cranes while they nest.

Habitat and Range
Eastern and Southern South Africa, primarily in dry upland grasslands. Roosts and nests in wetlands. There are a few isolated populations in Namibia. Stanley (Blue) cranes are non-migratory. They are more terrestrial than most other crane species.

Diet
Stanley cranes are omnivores eating plant material, primarily grass seeds, insects (especially grasshoppers), fish, small reptiles, and small mammals. Usually forages on the ground.

Lifespan
About 30 years

Reproduction
Stanley cranes are monogamous,  have a strong pair bond, and both parents care for the chicks.
Sexual Maturity: 3-5 years
Mating Season: Usually October through December. Nests are in grasslands near water. Nests are very minimal, and eggs are often laid on the ground.
Incubation: About 30-33 days.
No. of Young: Female lays 2 eggs. Chicks fledge at about 85 days.