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Egyptian Goose by Cheryl Crowley

Goose, Egyptian

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Description

The Egyptian Goose male and female have similar coloring, although the male is usually a little larger. The back feathers are reddish brown, with some varied black, green and orange. The chest is a buff beige, and there is a distinct brownish-red ring of feathers around each eye. The ring is elongated, similar to the kohl makeup the ancient Egyptians used around their eyes. Beaks and legs are pink. Adult wingspan ranges from 35-40 cm (about 15 inches).

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Anseriformes
Family
Anatidae
Genus
Alopochen
Species
A. aegyptiaca
Conservation Status
Least Concern

Key Facts

Height
63-73 cm (about 27 inches)
Weight
1.5-2.25 kg (about 4.4 pounds)

The IUCN classifies Alopochen aegyptiaca as a species of Least Concern. Total population while not quantified, is know to be decreasing.

Social Life
Egyptian geese generally live in small flocks, pairing off during the breeding season. They are non-migratory and will stay in one general area unless drought, predator concentrations, or other factors impact their home range.

Habitat and Range
Egyptian Geese are found throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in the  Nile Valley from which they get their name. They have spread to Great Britain, Italy, France, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands, where they live in areas with open water, short grass, and suitable nesting sites such as holes in trees or islands. It is believed that these geese were originally captive birds that escaped. Egyptian geese are found in many habitats including wetlands, meadows, grasslands, and agricultural fields, though they avoid densely wooded areas.

Diet
Mainly seeds, leaves, grasses and other plant parts, as well as insects, worms and other small animals.  Very young goslings often feed on freshwater plankton.

Lifespan
Wild lifespan has not been documented. In captivity, the oldest recorded goose was 14 years of age.

Predators
Predators in Africa can include lions, cheetahs, crocodiles and vultures.

Reproduction
Egyptian geese are monogamous.  The male and female both care for the eggs, which are laid near water in dense vegetation, holes in the ground, or sometimes in the discarded nests of other birds.
Sexual Maturity: About 2 years.
Mating Season: Spring, or the end of dry season.
Incubation: 28-30 days.
No. of Young: Females lay a clutch of 5-12 eggs. The young fledge at about 70 days. They are precocial, meaning that they hatch in an advanced state, and are ready to feed themselves almost immediately.

Information

Description

The Egyptian Goose male and female have similar coloring, although the male is usually a little larger. The back feathers are reddish brown, with some varied black, green and orange. The chest is a buff beige, and there is a distinct brownish-red ring of feathers around each eye. The ring is elongated, similar to the kohl makeup the ancient Egyptians used around their eyes. Beaks and legs are pink. Adult wingspan ranges from 35-40 cm (about 15 inches).

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Anseriformes
Family
Anatidae
Genus
Alopochen
Species
A. aegyptiaca
Conservation Status
Least Concern

Key Facts

Height
63-73 cm (about 27 inches)
Weight
1.5-2.25 kg (about 4.4 pounds)

The IUCN classifies Alopochen aegyptiaca as a species of Least Concern. Total population while not quantified, is know to be decreasing.

Social Life
Egyptian geese generally live in small flocks, pairing off during the breeding season. They are non-migratory and will stay in one general area unless drought, predator concentrations, or other factors impact their home range.

Habitat and Range
Egyptian Geese are found throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in the  Nile Valley from which they get their name. They have spread to Great Britain, Italy, France, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands, where they live in areas with open water, short grass, and suitable nesting sites such as holes in trees or islands. It is believed that these geese were originally captive birds that escaped. Egyptian geese are found in many habitats including wetlands, meadows, grasslands, and agricultural fields, though they avoid densely wooded areas.

Diet
Mainly seeds, leaves, grasses and other plant parts, as well as insects, worms and other small animals.  Very young goslings often feed on freshwater plankton.

Lifespan
Wild lifespan has not been documented. In captivity, the oldest recorded goose was 14 years of age.

Predators
Predators in Africa can include lions, cheetahs, crocodiles and vultures.

Reproduction
Egyptian geese are monogamous.  The male and female both care for the eggs, which are laid near water in dense vegetation, holes in the ground, or sometimes in the discarded nests of other birds.
Sexual Maturity: About 2 years.
Mating Season: Spring, or the end of dry season.
Incubation: 28-30 days.
No. of Young: Females lay a clutch of 5-12 eggs. The young fledge at about 70 days. They are precocial, meaning that they hatch in an advanced state, and are ready to feed themselves almost immediately.