Safari West TEMPORARILY CLOSED due to Glass Fire Read More
Guineafowl Helmeted by Steve Murdock

Guineafowl, Helmeted

Share:

Description

The Helmeted Guineafowl is about 42-47 cm (17-19 inches) tall, with a wingspan of 25-28 cm (about 10 inches).  They weigh about 1.6 kg (3.5 pounds). The small head is featherless and has a yellowish spur on top. The skin color can be white, blue or red. The body is quite round, with grey- black feathers speckled with white spots. Wings and tail are short.

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Galliformes
Family
Numididae
Genus
Numida
Species
N. meleagris
Conservation Status
Least Concern

Key Facts

Height
42-47 cm (17-19 inches)
Weight
1.6 kg (3.5 pounds)

The IUCN classifies Numida meleagris as a species of Least Concern. The wild population is large and stable and the species has been widely domesticated and propagated in human managed care.

Social Life
Guineafowl are gregarious and are often found in flocks of 25 or more birds. They can fly, but prefer to walk or run; they can travel up to 10 km (6 miles) per day. They are diurnal, spending many of the daylight hours scratching on the ground for insects, much like domestic chickens.  At night they roost in trees.

Habitat and Range
Helmeted guineafowl are found throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa in the Savannah or lightly forested areas.

Diet
Omnivorous, helmeted guineafowl eat insects and spiders, small reptiles, seeds, fruit, worms, and tiny mammals.

Lifespan
12-15 years.

Predators
Carnivores, including lions, cheetahs, wild dogs, and crocodiles.

Reproduction
Males and females mate for life. During mating season, the males are often aggressive, running at each other with raised wings and an open beak.
Sexual Maturity: About 2 years.
Mating Season: In the spring, or after the rainy season.
Incubation: 26-30 days. Chicks fledge at 10-14 days, but usually stay with their parents for about 60 days.
No. of Young: 6-12 per clutch, laid in a scrape in the ground in a well-hidden area. Young guineafowl are called keets, and are precocial. They begin to forage for food with the flock within hours of hatching.

Information

Description

The Helmeted Guineafowl is about 42-47 cm (17-19 inches) tall, with a wingspan of 25-28 cm (about 10 inches).  They weigh about 1.6 kg (3.5 pounds). The small head is featherless and has a yellowish spur on top. The skin color can be white, blue or red. The body is quite round, with grey- black feathers speckled with white spots. Wings and tail are short.

Classification

Class
Aves
Order
Galliformes
Family
Numididae
Genus
Numida
Species
N. meleagris
Conservation Status
Least Concern

Key Facts

Height
42-47 cm (17-19 inches)
Weight
1.6 kg (3.5 pounds)

The IUCN classifies Numida meleagris as a species of Least Concern. The wild population is large and stable and the species has been widely domesticated and propagated in human managed care.

Social Life
Guineafowl are gregarious and are often found in flocks of 25 or more birds. They can fly, but prefer to walk or run; they can travel up to 10 km (6 miles) per day. They are diurnal, spending many of the daylight hours scratching on the ground for insects, much like domestic chickens.  At night they roost in trees.

Habitat and Range
Helmeted guineafowl are found throughout much of sub-Saharan Africa in the Savannah or lightly forested areas.

Diet
Omnivorous, helmeted guineafowl eat insects and spiders, small reptiles, seeds, fruit, worms, and tiny mammals.

Lifespan
12-15 years.

Predators
Carnivores, including lions, cheetahs, wild dogs, and crocodiles.

Reproduction
Males and females mate for life. During mating season, the males are often aggressive, running at each other with raised wings and an open beak.
Sexual Maturity: About 2 years.
Mating Season: In the spring, or after the rainy season.
Incubation: 26-30 days. Chicks fledge at 10-14 days, but usually stay with their parents for about 60 days.
No. of Young: 6-12 per clutch, laid in a scrape in the ground in a well-hidden area. Young guineafowl are called keets, and are precocial. They begin to forage for food with the flock within hours of hatching.