Patas Monkey

Monkey, Patas

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  • Information
  • Conservation
  • Lifestyle

Description

This streamlined monkey has a golden brown coat with a bright white chest and abdomen. Its protruding face is nearly hairless though marked with a lengthy blond mustache. The paths monkey’s long, proportionate legs relative to its body size present a dog like appearance when they are seen walking or running at a distance. Like many mammals the males of this species are considerably larger than the females in body size and in the projection of their face. This more prognathic (jutting out) mid-facial region houses accentuated canine teeth in males that may act for intimidation or as weapons in response to a threat.

Classification

Class
Mammalia
Order
Primates
Family
Cercopithecus
Genus
Erythrocebus
Species
E. patas
Conservation Status
Least Concern

Key Facts

Height
20-27 in (~50-70 cm)
Weight
15-29 lb (~7-13 kg)

The IUCN Red List describes Erythrocebus patas as a species of Least Concern noting that it is widespread throughout the Sahel region with pockets of dense populations. Potential threats to current populations include overhunting, extermination as crop pests, and habitat loss to agricultural and rural development.

Social Life
Groups, or troupes, of patas monkey are known to range in size anywhere from five to fifty individuals. These groups are typically more populated by females and their offspring than by males. Young males may grow up with their family group but around the age of three will leave to join all male ‘bachelor’ groups or be solitary until they can fight for a group of their own. With the females staying with their family groups most territorial and hierarchical aggression is seen from them. Males will fight with other males for the rights to maintain their role in the female dominated troupe, but often stay out of territorial bouts.

Habitat and Range
A terrestrial primate, patas monkeys spend their lives in the open grasslands and dry forests from the southernmost areas of the Sahara and into the northernmost region of equatorial Africa. A life constantly on the move, these savanna dwellers range two to three miles each day foraging and socializing while finding trees to shelter and sleep in during the hottest hours.

Diet
As omnivores in the savannas and steppes of Africa, patas monkey forage for a wide variety of resources. They will feed on more than 30 different plant species eating everything from the fruits, to seeds, leaves, and gums. Along with the plant life these monkeys will commonly feed on insects and insect larvae, amphibians, reptiles, eggs, and birds.

Lifespan
Patas monkeys are known to live up to 28 years in captivity with an average lifespan in the wild ranging from 15-20 years.

Predators
Black-backed jackals and domestic dogs are the most cited predators of patas monkeys, though leopards, lions, hyenas, wild dogs, servals, cheetahs and baboons are also suspected predators.

Reproduction
Sexual maturity:  Male: 2.5-3 years, Female: 3.5-4 years
Mating Season:    July to September (Dry season)
Birth Season:        January to February
Gestation:              5-6 months
No. of Young:        1

Information

Description

This streamlined monkey has a golden brown coat with a bright white chest and abdomen. Its protruding face is nearly hairless though marked with a lengthy blond mustache. The paths monkey’s long, proportionate legs relative to its body size present a dog like appearance when they are seen walking or running at a distance. Like many mammals the males of this species are considerably larger than the females in body size and in the projection of their face. This more prognathic (jutting out) mid-facial region houses accentuated canine teeth in males that may act for intimidation or as weapons in response to a threat.

Classification

Class
Mammalia
Order
Primates
Family
Cercopithecus
Genus
Erythrocebus
Species
E. patas
Conservation Status
Least Concern

Key Facts

Height
20-27 in (~50-70 cm)
Weight
15-29 lb (~7-13 kg)
Conservation

The IUCN Red List describes Erythrocebus patas as a species of Least Concern noting that it is widespread throughout the Sahel region with pockets of dense populations. Potential threats to current populations include overhunting, extermination as crop pests, and habitat loss to agricultural and rural development.

Lifestyle

Social Life
Groups, or troupes, of patas monkey are known to range in size anywhere from five to fifty individuals. These groups are typically more populated by females and their offspring than by males. Young males may grow up with their family group but around the age of three will leave to join all male ‘bachelor’ groups or be solitary until they can fight for a group of their own. With the females staying with their family groups most territorial and hierarchical aggression is seen from them. Males will fight with other males for the rights to maintain their role in the female dominated troupe, but often stay out of territorial bouts.

Habitat and Range
A terrestrial primate, patas monkeys spend their lives in the open grasslands and dry forests from the southernmost areas of the Sahara and into the northernmost region of equatorial Africa. A life constantly on the move, these savanna dwellers range two to three miles each day foraging and socializing while finding trees to shelter and sleep in during the hottest hours.

Diet
As omnivores in the savannas and steppes of Africa, patas monkey forage for a wide variety of resources. They will feed on more than 30 different plant species eating everything from the fruits, to seeds, leaves, and gums. Along with the plant life these monkeys will commonly feed on insects and insect larvae, amphibians, reptiles, eggs, and birds.

Lifespan
Patas monkeys are known to live up to 28 years in captivity with an average lifespan in the wild ranging from 15-20 years.

Predators
Black-backed jackals and domestic dogs are the most cited predators of patas monkeys, though leopards, lions, hyenas, wild dogs, servals, cheetahs and baboons are also suspected predators.

Reproduction
Sexual maturity:  Male: 2.5-3 years, Female: 3.5-4 years
Mating Season:    July to September (Dry season)
Birth Season:        January to February
Gestation:              5-6 months
No. of Young:        1

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Monkey, Patas